Programme


This page will be regularly updated. All timings below are provisional and will be confirmed closer to the date of the conference.

You'll get your badge and programme when you arrive. If you're late, it's not a problem, but you must register at reception before attending any talks.

Timings

Saturday

StartStream 1 (LT1)Stream 2 (LT2)
08:30Registration
09:00Welcome and Opening: Anu Damale
09:30Sponsor TalkStudent Presentations Introduction
09:40Prof. Bill Chaplin
University of Birmingham
Student Presentation 1
10:15Prof. Martin Freer
IOP
Student Presentation 2
10:50Break & Careers Fair
11:25Lunar Exploration PanelStudent Presentation 3
12:00Student Presentation 4
12:35Lunch & Careers Fair
13:00Kathryn Sullivan book signing
13:35Dr Kathryn Sullivan
Keynote Speaker
14:45Dr Emma Taylor
Safety and Reliability Society
Paolo Ridolfi
Airbus Defence and Space
15:20Sue Nelson
Boffin Media
15:55Break & Careers Fair
16:30Sponsor TalkSponsor Talk
16:40Use of Data PanelNaomi Rowe-Gurney
University of Leicester
17:15Dr Gerry Doyle
Raytheon Systems Limited
17:50Karoly Kornel Schlosser
Goldsmiths, University of London
18:25Awards Presentation
18:35Networking Reception (sponsored by First Steps Legal)
19:35Meal & Social

Sunday

StartStream 1 (LT1)Stream 2 (LT2)
09:00Registration
09:30Sponsor TalkJodie Howlett
ESA's Young Graduate Trainee (YGT) programme
09:40Prof. Alberto Vecchio
Institute for Gravitational Wave Astronomy - University of Birmingham
Ralph Dinsley
Northern Space and Security Limited
10:15Alexandra Stickings
Royal United Services Institute
Dr Nina Purvis
Queen Mary, University of London/King's College London
10:50Break & Careers Fair
11:25Sponsor TalkQuickfire Student Project Presentations
11:35Diversity and Inclusion Panel
12:10Julia Hunter-Anderson
Blue-Space Systems
12:45Lunch & Careers Fair
13:45Sustainablity PanelProf. Grunde Jomaas
The University of Edinburgh
14:20Pavlo Tanasyuk
Spacebit
14:55UKSEDS Annual General Meeting
15:30
16:05
16:40

Speakers

Handprints on Hubble

Dr Kathryn Sullivan | Keynote Speaker

Kathryn Sullivan

Kathryn D. Sullivan is a NASA astronaut (retired), former Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and an inductee in the Astronaut Hall of Fame.

The Hubble Space Telescope has revolutionized our understanding of the universe. It has, among many other achievements, revealed thousands of galaxies in what seemed to be empty patches of sky; transformed our knowledge of black holes; found dwarf planets with moons orbiting other stars; and measured precisely how fast the universe is expanding. In Handprints on Hubble, retired astronaut Kathryn Sullivan describes her work on the NASA team that made all of this possible. Sullivan, the first American woman to walk in space, recounts how she and other astronauts, engineers, and scientists launched, rescued, repaired, and maintained Hubble, the most productive observatory ever built.


Asteroseismology with TESS and Kepler: Opening new windows on the interiors of stars

Prof. Bill Chaplin | University of Birmingham

Bill Chaplin

Bill Chaplin is a Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Birmingham, and Deputy Head of its School of Physics and Astronomy. His research is focused on studies of the Sun and stars using their natural oscillations, and he has led large international teams using data from the NASA Kepler and TESS Missions.

I will review some of the latest, exciting results from the NASA TESS Mission, and also discuss the legacy that the NASA Kepler Mission has left us. I will in particular focus on asteroseismology, the study of stars by observation of their natural oscillations, the unique insights Kepler and TESS are giving us on stars, and the natural synergies with studies of exoplanet systems (for which accurate characterisation of the host stars is vital).


‘Institute of Physics presents: Nuclear Science in Space; and a voyage of a physicist at the IOP.’

Prof. Martin Freer | IOP

Martin Freer

Professor Martin Freer is Head of Nuclear Physics, Director of the Birmingham Energy Institute and the Birmingham Centre for Nuclear Education and Research at the University of Birmingham. His main research area is the study of the structure of light nuclei, using nuclear reactions. This research is performed at international facilities worldwide. In addition, he is actively engaged in promoting research and educational programmes to support the UK’s investment in nuclear power generation. He received the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Prize, Humboldt Foundation, Germany in 2004 and the Rutherford Medal (IoP) in 2010.

Professor Martin Freer BSc, PhD, FInstP, Head of Nuclear Physics, Director of the Birmingham Energy Institute and the Birmingham Centre for Nuclear Education and Research at the University of Birmingham will be discussing nuclear science in space, and his journey as a physicist with the Institute of Physics (IOP), the professional body and learned society of physics in the UK & Ireland. Professor Martin will introduced by Julian Guassardo, Student Engagement Officer at the IOP, who will briefly discuss the work of the IOP and the benefits of engaging with the wider physics community.


Lunar Exploration Panel (chair)

Sue Nelson | Boffin Media

@sciencenelsonSue Nelson

Sue Nelson is an award-winning space journalist and broadcaster who makes short films for the European Space Agency, documentaries on space for BBC radio as well as producing other content for various scientific organisations within the UK. Co-presenter of the Space Boffins podcast and a writer for numerous publications, Sue is also a former BBC science correspondent and recently won a 2019 Sir Arthur Clarke Award for her book Wally Funk’s Race for Space about a member of the Mercury 13 and a little known part of women’s space history.


Lunar Exploration Panel

Paul Iliffe |

Paul Iliffe

Paul Iliffe currently works in the spacecraft operations department at Inmarsat in London, where he is responsible for the operations of Inmarsat’s 4th generation fleet of spacecraft. In addition to experience in the aerospace industry, he also has experience in academia and the not-for-profit sector. He has studied in the UK, Germany, Hong Kong, Japan, and France, is a fluent speaker of German and Japanese, and is an aspiring Ballroom dancer. Paul is an associate member of the Royal Aeronautical Society, a member of the Moon Village Association, and guest lecturer at the International Space University.


Lunar Exploration Panel

Hannah Sargeant | The Open University

@Hannah_SargeyHannah Sargeant

Hannah is a PhD researcher looking at water production on the Moon to support future space exploration missions. She is working on a European Space Agency instrument called ProSPA that will land on the Moon on-board Luna-27 in 2025 looking to perform one of the first water production experiments on the lunar surface. Aside from her research, Hannah is an award winning STEM ambassador passionate about promoting space research to the public.


Lunar Exploration Panel

Ryan Wall | Lockheed Martin Space

Ryan Wall

Ryan Wall is a Systems Engineer with a specialty in Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) within Advanced Programs at Lockheed Martin Space, developing the Artemis Human Lunar Lander. Ryan was awarded a degree in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2018, where he performed research on algae-based bioregenerative life support systems and the utilization of alternative reality to design complex systems. Ryan has a passion for STEM outreach and hopes to help inspire the next generation of space explorers.


Mars Sample Return and Sample Fetch Rover - Mission Overview

Paolo Ridolfi | Airbus Defence and Space

Paolo Ridolfi

Paolo Ridolfi is a Mechanical Engineer with a specialisation in Space Systems. He started his career in the field of industrial robotics and soon moved to the space sector, working on Earth Observation missions and then focusing on the exploration of Mars for the last few years. He has been responsible for the development of the Locomotion Subsystem and Solar Arrays Mechanism of the ExoMars Rover, and has been leading the development of the Sample Fetch Rover in the areas of surface mobility, robotics and mechanisms since the programme started its Phase A.

The presentation goes through the ambitious architecture of the Mars Sample Return campaign, joint endeavour between NASA and ESA. It describes the current status of the project and highlights the key challenges ahead.


Safety in Space: What's Next?

Dr Emma Taylor | Safety and Reliability Society

@etaylorengineerEmma Taylor

With 30 years’ engineering experience across transport, energy and space, Dr Emma Ariane Taylor is a Trustee and Council Member of the Safety and Reliability Society (SaRS), a cross-sector charity. Using her profile as an FT Inclusive Boards Top 100 Most Influential Women in Engineering she is raising awareness of safety in space, something that has interested her since her space debris impact PhD in the 1990s. (And time on UKSEDS council in 1990). As a Telegraph Top 50 Woman Engineer, Emma also promotes engineering professional registration (CEng and IEng) across all sectors. She is a Fellow of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, the Royal Astronomical Society and the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce.

Space exploration and utilisation is changing, driven by the rapid growth in non-governmental operators ('NewSpace'). International treaties and agencies provide the framework, but new challenges in safety and sustainability, both legislative and technical, are emerging. It's not clear if there is an easy solution. Other sectors have dealt with other challenges (e.g. energy, transport), so there is useful common ground that can be repurposed for space. This will talk will highlight the gaps and the overlaps and highlight key upcoming ‘hot topic’ themes.


Spacecraft Operations on Sentinel-3

Ed Trollope | EUMETSAT

@rocketeddyEd Trollope

Former UKSEDS Vice-Chair Ed Trollope is a spacecraft operations engineer for EUMETSAT, on the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission.
Ed graduated from four UK universities before being cruelly exiled to “get a job (and a haircut)”. Since 2004 he’s been working in Germany, helping to land robots on other worlds and predict the weather. His first space mission was the Rosetta Lander; in the roles of software engineer, spacecraft operations engineer, simulator project manager and tweeter. These days he supports projects closer to home in the form of polar orbiting Earth observation missions… but he still hasn’t got that haircut.
(Image ©EUMETSAT)

The Sentinel-3 mission is part of the European Commission’s Copernicus programme for Earth Observation, delivering a variety of high-quality land and ocean measurements from a series of four satellites. Two of these satellites are flying today, with EUMETSAT responsible for the operation of the satellites and the processing and delivery of ocean data. From routine operations to contingency handling and collision avoidance manoeuvres, this talk will describe “a day in the life” of a spacecraft operations engineer and the associated career options available at EUMETSAT.


Women in Space

Sue Nelson | Boffin Media

@sciencenelsonSue Nelson

Sue Nelson is an award-winning space journalist and broadcaster who makes short films for the European Space Agency, documentaries on space for BBC radio as well as producing other content for various scientific organisations within the UK. Co-presenter of the Space Boffins podcast and a writer for numerous publications, Sue is also a former BBC science correspondent and recently won a 2019 Sir Arthur Clarke Award for her book Wally Funk’s Race for Space about a member of the Mercury 13 and a little known part of women’s space history.

Sue Nelson, journalist and author of Wally Funk’s Race for Space, shares a brief history of women in space - from the little known Mercury 13 and other ‘hidden figures’ - through the groundbreaking Shuttle era to the role models of today. Sue shares the challenges, the sexism and the sheer brilliance of these female trailblazers along with some personal stories of some incredible women.


Use of Data Panel (chair)

Matjaz Vidmar | The University of Edinburgh

@vidmarmatjazMatjaz Vidmar

Matjaz Vidmar is a researcher in Science, Technology and Innovation Studies at the University of Edinburgh. He is an (Astro)Physicist by training, now examining innovation and (inter-)organisational change as well as other social dimensions of Astronomy and Outer Space Exploration and Industry, in particular as related to space data applications and ecologies. You can find more at www.roe.ac.uk/~vidmar


Use of Data Panel

Kristina Tamane | The University of Edinburgh

@kri0sisKristina Tamane

Kristina supports the University of Edinburgh’s School of GeoSciences with commercial activity related to space, data and satellites. She facilitates relationships between companies and the University to drive innovation and create collaborative research opportunities. Kristina leads on the SPRINT (Space Research and Innovation Network for Technology) Programme for the University, fostering links with SMEs. She also supports academic colleagues to deliver on the City Region Deal and Data Driven Innovation Programme for the City of Edinburgh. Kristina brings with her experience and skills from both the private and public sectors, a commercial mindset and a relentless enthusiasm for the space sector.


Use of Data Panel

Karina Wardak | UKRI Science and Technology Facilities Council

Karina Wardak

Karina Wardak is Business Incubation and Innovation Manager at the Higgs Centre for Innovation in Edinburgh which was created by the Science and Technology Facilities Council and in partnership with the University of Edinburgh applies business incubation best practice to big data, astronomy, particle physics and space technology, enabling start-ups to translate fundamental research into wider commercial impact. The Higgs Centre for Innovation gives incubated companies access to offices, Specialist Lab facilities and the Data Visualisation Suite. Karina Wardak has studied space law in Paris and has worked in several international organisation and cities in Europe.


Use of Data Panel

Samuel Bancroft | Earth-i

@SpiruelSamuel Bancroft

Sam works as a developer at Earth-i, using machine learning and computer vision to extract insight from Earth observation data. Since graduating in Physics in 2018, Sam has worked with 3D satellite imagery, synthetic-aperture radar, and optical imagery in order to solve problems related to commodity-tracking, food security, construction monitoring and more.


The Ice Giants

Naomi Rowe-Gurney | University of Leicester

@NRoweGurneyNaomi Rowe-Gurney

Naomi is a PhD student at the University of Leicester, specialising in the atmospheres of the ice giants, Uranus and Neptune. She uses data from the Spitzer Space Telescope to characterise the stratospheres of the two planets in preparation for the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).

This talk will take you on a journey to the outer solar-system to discover why Uranus and Neptune are the most exciting destinations for future exploration.


Something new under the sun: Threats to Space Systems?

Dr Gerry Doyle | Raytheon Systems Limited

Gerry Doyle

Gerry Doyle hails from NE Scotland and joined the RAF in 1981. After a full career, latterly helping the RAF develop space capability, he retired in 2019 and now works for Raytheon in the UK as a programme manager in their space team. He has a BSc in Computational Science from the University of St Andrews, an MPhil from Cambridge University in International Relations, and a PhD from the University of Reading, with a thesis on Bernard Schriever and Early US Military Spaceflight. He is also a faculty member at the London Institute of Space Policy and Law.

Some threats to space-based systems are relatively well understood: debris (natural and artificial), the generally hostile environment and the fragility of the systems themselves. But is the rapidly changing nature of space operations introducing new challenges and threats? In this talk, I will seek to do two things. One is to outline ‘non-traditional’ threats and how they might arise, the other is to suggest (with biographical illustrations) that the responses to them may involve non-traditional actors too.


Space Security

Dr Hina Khan | Spire Global UK

Hina Khan

Hina has over 25yrs experience in the space sector, from university research, to working with companies to understand how to use data from space, and now managing all of the Spire Global's interest in the UK to solve global challenges from space. She has a PhD in Space Science, held research posts at NASA GSFC, ESTEC and MSSL, before moving to using knowledge and expertise to help industry access and apply space data to real problems. She led the Scottish Centre of Excellence in Satellite Applications to galvanise the space sector in Scotland, and now work with one of the most innovation new space small satellite companies, Space Global, who provide data and services on weather forecasting, ship tracking and global aircraft movement to address global challenges.

The same miniaturisation of technology that fuels ever more powerful smartphones and laptops has also revolutionised the satellite industry. Satellites the size of trucks that took decades to build have been replaced by constellations of cubesats, each small enough to hold in your hands. The much lower cost of these small satellites allows us to develop solutions to critical global issues with incredible agility and speed. Hina will discuss the role of the commercial small satellite industry in addressing such challenges in a way that was unheard of only a decade ago.


Training people how to act deliberately in each moment promotes long-duration mission success: behavioural science to increase performance.

Karoly Kornel Schlosser | Goldsmiths, University of London

Karoly Kornel Schlosser

Being a professional in psychology means to me doing my best in helping people to find competency, vitality, and meaning in their own lives. At this end, I am a PhD researcher in Psychology in the Institute of Management Studies, Goldsmiths, University of London, and a part-time teaching fellow in the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King’s College London. I am an ACT and MBCT instructor. My research focuses on developing, delivering and testing brief contextual behavioural science (mindfulness, acceptance and commitment) based interventions for people performing in stressful situations. These include premiere and Olympic/Paralympic athletes and coaches, A-level students and teachers, the European Space Agency’s Astronaut Operation Team, and astronaut trainees in Mars analog mission simulations. Observed beneficial outcomes of the brief training include improved mental health, psychological well-being, leadership competencies, and increased productivity, team cohesion and ability to observe one’s private events (thoughts, feelings, and sensations). My research is funded by the European Space Agency, the Association for Contextual Behavioural Science, and UK Sports.

Applied psychology in space exploration is becoming key interest point as humanity is attempting to take the next leap to establish a sustainable habitat on the Moon and to explore Mars. It is crucial for astronauts to provide outstanding performance, to remain resilient and to maintain their psychological well-being in order to successfully accomplish their mission in such extreme and isolated environments. We believe that contextual behavioural science is well placed to improve the psychological skills needed to increase and maintain these key psychological and behavioural skills.


ESA’s Young Graduate Trainee (YGT) programme

Jodie Howlett | ESA's Young Graduate Trainee (YGT) programme

Jodie Howlett

Jodie is a Young Graduate Trainee at ESA, based at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt, Germany. In her role, she is assessing the performance of key processes for ground segment development and mission operations. Funded by the UK Space Agency, she completed the Space Studies Program 2019 at the International Space University. In 2019, Jodie also graduated with an Integrated Master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from Sheffield Hallam University. At university, she completed aerospace and biomedical engineering internships in the UK, Singapore and South Africa, and was listed in the UK’s Top 50 Women in Engineering 2017.

Already interested in joining the European Space Agency’s Young Graduate Trainee (YGT) programme? Or simply want to know what it’s about? Then come and hear directly from a current YGT! This talk will give an overview on what it’s like to be a YGT, including examples of the exciting work you can get involved in and the main benefits it brings. The application process will also be discussed, with top tips on how to make your application stand out.


Gravitational waves and spacetime fireworks: A new era in astronomy

Prof. Alberto Vecchio | Institute for Gravitational Wave Astronomy - University of Birmingham

@agmvecchioAlberto Vecchio

Alberto Vecchio is Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Birmingham, and co-Founder and current Director of the Institute for Gravitational Wave Astronomy. His work spans many aspects of gravitational-wave science and observations. He is a member of the LIGO Team that detected gravitational waves in September 2015 and discovered the first binary black hole merger. He is Royal Society Wolfson Fellow and co-recipient of the 2016 Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics

Gravitational waves were first detected in 2015, a hundred years since Einstein predicted this form of radiation as a fundamental consequence of his theory of relativity. This first observation marked the beginning of a new era in astronomy, and of explorations of some of the most violent phenomena in the cosmos. We have discovered binary black holes, which we now know are abundant in the Universe, and observed for the first time the collision of a pair of neutron stars. This is just the beginning of a new journey to unveil some of the best-kept secrets of our Universe.


Space Situational Awareness - Foundational To Space Sustainability

Ralph Dinsley | Northern Space and Security Limited

Ralph Dinsley

Ralph “Dinz” Dinsley is a retired RAF Officer with over 32 years of service. A “Fighter Controller” by choice and “Space Tracking Practitioner” by chance his distinguished career culminated in leading UK MOD Space Situational Awareness in 2 significant programmes. His unique military space experience was underpinned as a CAS Fellow, with an MA in Peace and Development from Leeds Beckett. Since retiring Dinz founded NORSS, a rapidly expanding commercial SSA company based in Northumberland. An observer to the Hague Space Resource Governance Working Group and dedicated to exploring the influence of Space Law on developments for Space Traffic Management.

Without appropriate and accurate information on the space environment and activities in space it is impossible to effectively manage how we utilise this finite resource. I will introduce the basics of Space Situational Awareness (SSA), explore the UK contribution to global SSA and explain the growth of commercial capabilities to support the legacy framework(s). I shall conclude by discussing the need for democratisation of data of space and illustrate the growing need for Space Traffic Management.


Healthcare for Humans in Space

Dr Nina Purvis | Queen Mary, University of London/King's College London

@sivrup1990Nina Purvis

Nina is a student doctor hoping to specialise in aerospace medicine. She has an MPhys in Astrophysics and a PhD in Medical Imaging. She is currently taking a year out of traditional medical training to study for an MSc in Space Physiology and Health. Nina has completed training in Human Space Physiology at the European Space Agency. As an advocate for widening access to this exciting speciality, she recently presented at the Royal Aeronautical Society to call for more opportunities, mentors, and teaching of aerospace medicine at medical school. She is also a start-up committee member of their Next Generation of Aerospace Medicine subgroup.

Space medicine is “the practice of all aspects of preventative medicine including screening, health care delivery, and maintaining human performance in the extreme environment of space and preserving the long-term health of space travellers”. This talk will highlight some of the unique medical challenges of spaceflight and introduce space physiology and medicine as a clinical and research career. Many space medicine discoveries also help clinical populations on Earth. Ensuring astronaut and spaceflight participant health brings together clinical considerations, human factors, and engineering - a truly interdisciplinary field.


Space Security

Alexandra Stickings | Royal United Services Institute

@Ali_StickingsAlexandra Stickings

Alexandra is Research Fellow for Space Policy and Security in the Military Sciences team at RUSI. Her research covers military space programmes, space warfare, counterspace capabilities, space situational awareness, arms control and the intersection of space and missile defence. She has written articles and research papers for a variety of publications, is a frequent speaker at international conferences and regularly provides expert commentary to the media. Alexandra holds an MSc in International Security and Global Governance from Birkbeck College, University of London, a BA(Hons) in International Studies form the Open University and a BSc(Hons) in Physics with Astronomy from the University of Nottingham.

This talk will outline the main issues in international space security, covering the military usage of space and how militaries organise their space activities, the concept of space warfare, counterspace capabilities and arms control.


Diversity and Inclusion Panel (chair)

Sophia Lee Roberts | UKSEDS

@SophiaLRobertsSophia Lee Roberts

Sophia is a second year Physics and Philosophy undergraduate at King’s College London, and the current (Acting) Secretary of UKSEDS. She is an active member of the KCL Womxn in Physics Society, having sat on committee for the last two years, first as Fresher Representative and, more recently, as Treasurer; helping to promote an inclusive and supportive environment within the KCL Physics Department. In addition to this, Sophia is President of the King’s College London Space Society, the KCL branch of UKSEDS, and Chairs the organising committee for the Space Science & Engineering Foundation’s Galactic Challenge.


Diversity and Inclusion Panel

Dr Alfredo Carpineti | Pride in STEM

@DrCarpinetiAlfredo Carpineti

Dr. Alfredo Carpineti is an astrophysicist, science communicator, and social activist. He writes for I F*cking Love Science and also runs a podcast & live science show with cocktails on his blog, The Astroholic. He's the chair and founder of Pride in STEM, an award-nominated charity working to raise the profile and showcase the work of LGBTQ+ people working in STEM.


Diversity and Inclusion Panel

Divya Persaud | UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory

@Divya_M_PDivya Persaud

Divya M. Persaud is a planetary scientist, writer, and composer. Divya’s research has spanned mission development and operations; the surfaces and interiors of Mercury, Mars, and the icy moons of Saturn; and asteroids and the meteorites they come from. She is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in Space & Climate Physics at UCL’s Mullard Space Science Laboratory, where she is applying 3D image processing, visualization, and analysis to Mars surface geology. Divya is also an active artist; as a published poet she has been invited to read her work internationally, and released an album of her music in 2017.


Diversity and Inclusion Panel

Eleanor Armstrong | University College London

@ellietheelementEleanor Armstrong

Eleanor is a doctoral candidate at UCL studying the representation of space science narratives in London museums. In addition to her research, she develops and delivers tours on queer heritage in STEM at musuems including the Science Museum London, The Whipple Museum for the History of Science and the Sedgwick Earth Sciences Museum. Eleanor also co-chairs Science London, an organisation leading professional development in equity, diversity and inclusion through workshops for scientists and science communicators.


Our Planet Needs You!

Julia Hunter-Anderson | Blue-Space Systems

Julia Hunter-Anderson

Julia has over 30 years experience designing and operating Space Systems - working within industry, Agencies and academia mostly in Europe and Asia. She has a BSc(Hons) in Physics with Astrophysics from University of Birmingham, an MBA from University of Warwick and an MSc in Environmental Governance from United Nations University in Tokyo. After supporting conservation and sustainable development projects in SE Asia, Julia now runs a social enterprise - supporting clients to use and develop Space technologies. As Visiting Industrial Professor at University of Warwick, Julia also works with MEng students designing and building a CubeSat for wildlife monitoring. Julia co-founded UKSEDS in 1988.

The world is seeing unprecedented extreme weather events and biodiversity loss, largely attributable to human-induced climate change, pollution and land-use change. Space-based solutions present ongoing opportunities to help mitigate, adapt and build resilience to these threats. But which missions have the potential to help or even hinder? And what skills will young (and old!) graduates offer and need to participate effectively? This talk will introduce some of the key challenges and approaches to providing effective and sustainable space-based solutions, focussing on the role of Systems Thinking & Engineering, and drawing on Julia’s broad experience from inter-governmental collaborations to small startups.


Sustainability Panel (chair)

Portia Bowman | UKSEDS

@portiaspacePortia Bowman

Portia is a Space Systems Engineer who has worked on a variety of programmes since graduating in 2015, from launching cargo to the ISS, to an instrument observing the Earth's climate, to a LIDAR to land on the moon and a Mars Sample Handling Robot. Since working on a project that’s end goals were to observe CO2 emissions, but meetings for the team involved several flights a month, she has been interested in exploring how to make space technology more sustainable.


Sustainability Panel

Alexandra Stickings | Royal United Services Institute

@Ali_StickingsAlexandra Stickings

Alexandra is Research Fellow for Space Policy and Security in the Military Sciences team at RUSI. Her research covers military space programmes, space warfare, counterspace capabilities, space situational awareness, arms control and the intersection of space and missile defence. She has written articles and research papers for a variety of publications, is a frequent speaker at international conferences and regularly provides expert commentary to the media. Alexandra holds an MSc in International Security and Global Governance from Birkbeck College, University of London, a BA(Hons) in International Studies form the Open University and a BSc(Hons) in Physics with Astronomy from the University of Nottingham.


Sustainability Panel

Julia Hunter-Anderson | Blue-Space Systems

Julia Hunter-Anderson

Julia has over 30 years experience designing and operating Space Systems - working within industry, Agencies and academia mostly in Europe and Asia. She has a BSc(Hons) in Physics with Astrophysics from University of Birmingham, an MBA from University of Warwick and an MSc in Environmental Governance from United Nations University in Tokyo. After supporting conservation and sustainable development projects in SE Asia, Julia now runs a social enterprise - supporting clients to use and develop Space technologies. As Visiting Industrial Professor at University of Warwick, Julia also works with MEng students designing and building a CubeSat for wildlife monitoring. Julia co-founded UKSEDS in 1988.


Sustainability Panel

Josh Western | Space Forge

Josh Western

In 2018 Josh founded Space Forge with the ambition to save our home planet. SF develop technologies to significantly reduce the burden of humans on the environment. We do this by flying satellites into space to manufacture super-materials which can block 75% of CO2 from highly polluting sectors and bring them back to Earth for deployment in Earth's industries. Since graduating with a degree in Politics in 2014 Josh has worked for Thales Alenia Space working on everything from ExoMars to the detection of illegal pollution emissions. Josh is also seconded to the UK Space Agency, for the past 3 years he has assessed risks to the UK's satellites and worked across Europe to facilitate technology sharing and cooperation. He has so far managed to meet 8 astronauts and even got to chat to Tim Peake on Skype whilst he was on the ISS


Fire Safety in Space

Prof. Grunde Jomaas | The University of Edinburgh

@EdinburghFireGrunde Jomaas

Grunde Jomaas is Professor and BRE Chair of Fire Safety Engineering at the University of Edinburgh. Grunde has published numerous highly cited peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, reports and conference papers. These papers are based on a very broad experience in the field of fire safety engineering. As the coordinator for a Topical Team on Spacecraft Fire Safety funded by the European Space Agency, Grunde is currently also part of a scientific advisory team working with NASA and several other space agencies. Together they have designed six and operated three space experiments that are carried out in orbit after the Cygnus resupply spacecraft leaves the International Space Station. The experiments are unique both in size and duration when it comes to flame behaviour experiments in microgravity.

Until very recently, fire testing on an appropriate scale had never been carried out for manned spacecraft due to the complexity, cost and risk associated with operating a long duration fire safety experiment with a relevant size in microgravity. Thus, there was a knowledge gap related to fire behaviour in spacecraft, because the entire body of low-gravity fire research had either been conducted in short duration ground-based microgravity facilities or had been limited to very small fuel samples. Still, the work conducted to date had shown that fire behaviour in low-gravity is very different from that in normal-gravity, with differences observed for flammability limits, ignition delay, flame spread behaviour and flame structure. As a result, the prediction of the behaviour of fires in reduced gravity was not validated. To address this gap in knowledge, a collaborative international project, Spacecraft Fire Safety (SFS), was established with its cornerstone being the development and operation of experiments (SAFFIRE) to be conducted on Orbital Cygnus ISS resupply vehicle after de-berthing from the ISS and before re-entering the atmosphere. The first flight, SAFFIRE-1, was successfully completed in June 2016, and SAFFIRE-2 was completed in November 2016. SAFFIRE-3 will fly this year. The talk will focus on the experimental design, including parameter selection, and the operation of these experiments, plus what we can learn from the results, not only in terms of fire safety in space, but also in normal gravity.


The first UK mission to the Moon

Pavlo Tanasyuk | Spacebit

Pavlo Tanasyuk

Pavlo Tanasyuk is a CEO and founder of a UK space startup called Spacebit . In 2010 he graduated from LSE with a Master’s degree in Management and Information Systems. Pavlo also holds MPhil in Technology Policy from the University of Cambridge Business School. He ran a highly successful payment system company MoneXy which he later sold and invested the proceeds in space projects and the setting up of Spacebit. Pavlo’s passion has led Spacebit to sign a joint agreement with Astrobotic to begin commercial and scientific lunar exploration with the first mission in 2021 on the Peregrine lunar lander; marking the first payload from the UK to reach the Moon surface

An introduction of the first UK mission to the Moon and its program. Pavlo will discuss Spacebit's plans for the current and future missions and the opportunities for collaboration with other organisations.